Wisconsin’s Green Fire and Wisconsin Wildlife Federation Seeking Stories of Extreme Weather in Wisconsin

WI Green Fire, March 23, 2022

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America’s hunters, anglers, and other outdoorspeople have a keen eye; they know the best spot to cast a fly in the rapids, prime habitat for grouse, and the right place to catch a gorgeous sunset or spot a morel mushroom.  This keen eye also makes them acutely aware of changes in the natural landscape around them, from early ice-out on prime ice fishing lakes to the crunch of dry vegetation during a bird hunt.  In fact, some reports have found that scientists “feel three or four years behind what the fishermen see.”

Wisconsin’s Green Fire and Wisconsin Wildlife Federation are partnering to tell similar stories of changes in Wisconsin’s landscapes. We are hoping to hear from Wisconsin-based hunters, anglers, and outdoor recreationists to document experiences with extreme weather in Wisconsin and its impacts on hunting, fishing, and other outdoor experiences.

Fishing and hunting are one of the most popular activities in Wisconsin, with over 700,000 people engaging in a form of hunting and over one million in fishing activities each year! Each hunter and angler likely has a story about changes they have seen in the landscape over the years and generations. Similarly, hikers, foragers, bird watchers, and other outdoor recreationists likely have similar unique stories of change to share.

We are asking WGF members and friends to share their stories! You are welcome to share your story via email, a phone chat, and photos. We also encourage film or photographs of specific locations where you have observed changes, and any historical photos of those location(s).

If you’d like to share your story or know of someone who might, please contact Heather Stricker (hstricker@wigreenfire.org).

 

1The Guardian article 2019: “Not all environmentalists eat tofu: the hunters fighting climate change.”